Lost at Sea....

The musings of an out-of-place Dominican-York who belongs neither here nor there.

One thing is certain: there are as many nights as days, and the one is just as long as the other in the year’s course. Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word “happy” would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness.

Carl Jung (via a-thousand-words)

(Source: misswallflower, via a-thousand-words)

Your mother did not raise you with a wolf in your chest so you could howl over losing a man.

—read this on here today and i haven’t stopped thinking about this quote since. (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: pluiedem, via noldarling)

dynastylnoire:

1109-83:

funkymonkey-boy:

 ”A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so effective that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.”
They were slaughtered as part of a U.S. Government Policy to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there.

"…to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there."

America has been stuck on genocide ever since white people landed here.

dynastylnoire:

1109-83:

funkymonkey-boy:

 ”A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so effective that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.”

They were slaughtered as part of a U.S. Government Policy to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there.

"…to rid the plains of the main food source of the tribes that lived there."

America has been stuck on genocide ever since white people landed here.

(Source: the-big-bamboo, via freshmouthgoddess)

This was a very new experience, I’ve been in several conflict zones: I was in the civil war regions in Georgia, the Gaza strip, illegally visited the Kaliningrad region when travel to the Soviet Union was still strictly prohibited for westerners, I’ve been in Iraq, Vietnam and in China, I’ve met Cuba dissidents. But to be arrested and yelled at and be rudely treated by police? For that I had to travel to Ferguson and St. Louis in the United States of America.

—Ansgar Graw, A German journalist arrested in Ferguson (via kingjaffejoffer)

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

(via cosmic-sweets)